Category: talk

How many bro tats does Ed have and who are the…

How many bro tats does Ed have and who are they with and what are they please?

Oh, this is a good question! He has a lot of them, so let me think… I might accidentally leave some out. 

Ed got a little star on his elbow with his cousin Jethro (Alonestar), and Jethro got a plus on his chest for Ed:

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Ed got Pingu with Harry Styles while Harry got the word Pingu:

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Ed and Phoebe Dykstra traded “meow” and a pawprint:

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Ed and Jovel both got the Random Impulse logo:

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Ed and John Mayer drew these “kool guy” and cat tattoos for each other:

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Ed and the members of Rixton got “Ladz on tour” tattoos together: 

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Ed and Foy Vance got the words to Guiding Light in each other’s handwriting:

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Johnny McDaid has the same Guiding Light lyrics (I read somewhere that the song was actually written about Johnny’s father) and he drew Ed’s family tree tattoo: 

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Ed and Jordan and Harley from Rizzle Kicks got Fresh Prince tattoos together. Jordan got Fresh, Ed got Prince, and Harley got “on the playground is where I spent most of my days”: 

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Ed got puzzle pieces tattooed in a chain around his left arm, and a bunch of his friends got corresponding puzzle piece tattoos, including Stuart. Here’s Stuart showing his, which you can just barely make out as a smudge at the top of his arm because it’s a terrible quality photo:

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Ed also has some other tattoos that represent some of his friends or experiences he’s had with his friends, but I’m not sure if they have corresponding tattoos or not, so I don’t know if they count as official bro tats. And of course several of Ed’s friends got plus sign tattoos when + was released, so I suppose those are bro tats?

Anyway, these are the ones that I thought of right off the top of my head. If you can think of more, remind me and I’ll add them! 🙂 

My theme for the song is when you have a sort …

My theme for the song is when you have a sort of first relationship or second relationship and you’re young and that relationship ends – you’re so bitter about it and so angry. I feel like you get to 24 or 25, maybe younger if you’re a bit more mature, and you look at your exes in relationships and you’re just like ‘She actually looks a lot happier than when she was with me.‘ But I remember the first girl I was with – that the first and most of the second album were about – I was with from school, and I remember the guy she was with, meeting him one day and being like, ‘He’s so much more suited to her than I ever was.’ And seeing them together, we never looked like that. We were never that sort of couple, never that happy.

Hi there – Fran here. Ed Sheeran is hosting an…

Hi there – Fran here. Ed Sheeran is hosting an intimate charity concert (only 400 people) for the London Irish Centre Charity in London on June 19th and fans have the chance to win tickets by donating just £10 pounds they will be entered in a draw. The draw close on March 31st. It's a great opportunity for super fans to win tickets to what is going to be a great show. More info is on Ed Sheeran's Instagram page (scroll down to St Patrick's Day video) – please can you post this? Thank you

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Where did ginger nine incher spring from?

Where did ginger nine incher spring from?

Somewhere in this area, if the rumors are true:

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Heh, actually the boy himself was the first to make that comment, so I think we can call this rumor #confirmed! 😉

He went through a period of time when he liked to hijack other people’s twitter accounts and tweet from them, so the ginger nine incher tweet originated on… I think, Trevor’s account? Let me check. 

Yup. 

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Hi Jen, Big fan of the blog although I guess i…

Hi Jen, Big fan of the blog although I guess i'm not a typical Ed Sheeran fan as a 37 year old bloke. I'm hoping you can help me find a version of YNMIDNY I used to have, it's acoustic, similar to the Bing Lounge version, but starts with him saying something like 'when I first started this song was only 2 minutes long, it was absolutely sh*t'. I remember it being amazing. Thanks in advance.

Hi! I’m sorry I’ve taken so long to get to your question. First let me just say, lots of guys like Ed’s music, and lots of people in their thirties do too, so I hope you don’t feel out of place here or anything like that. You’re in good company. Everyone here has excellent taste in music. 🙂 

I tried to find the version of YNMIDNY that you’re talking about, and I sort of got sucked down into a big Youtube black hole. I didn’t find one with that quote, but do you think it could have been [this]? At the beginning, he says he used to play without a tuner and it sounded terrible… But you’re probably thinking of a different one because I think I remember which one you’re talking about and it wasn’t the live room. But I do think this is an excellent version anyway. 

Here’s the one I personally used when I finally sat myself down and made myself learn all the lyrics to the extended version. I had a concert the next day and I didn’t want to be there not knowing all the words like I had before. xD And this was the version he was performing in the US at the time: 

Gosh. There’s so many really fun live versions of YNMIDNY, aren’t there? I rewatched a lot of old gems looking for the version you mentioned, and I got all nostalgic. Look at this one where he begins with the black cab part from the You Need Me EP and actually sings more than he raps:

Also I love this version with Pass Out in it. How happy is Ed here? Performing with no shoes! And he brings Murray up on stage. I would have loved to be there for this performance!

And in case there’s someone who hasn’t seen it yet, here’s the livestream Ed did a few years ago to explain the evolution of YNMIDNY, and then he performs the version he put out on the One Take EP. It’s in two parts and definitely worth the watch if you like the song!

I’m sorry I couldn’t help you find the exact version you were looking for, but thanks for inspiring me to look up these old videos again! I hope if someone else knows which version you mentioned then they’ll leave a comment or send a message. 

I also have your other question here, which I think is just a fascinating discussion to have, but I’m going to think on it a little more before I answer. 🙂 

Hey Jen! How about another random fact about E…

Hey Jen! How about another random fact about Ed? Miss the good old days.😉

Hello! So do I. 🙂

Here’s a random fact about Ed: Every time he writes a song and gives it to another artist to record, he makes sure he is on the recording somewhere. So when you’re listening to certain songs released by other musicians, you can often hear Ed doing backing vocals or playing guitar and you might not even realize it! 

My favorite instance of this is on Strip That Down, which Ed wrote for Liam Payne. In it, the weirdly low voice that goes, “Strip that down, girl, love when you hit the ground,” is actually Ed Sheeran’s voice distorted. You can listen here at about the 1:20 mark:

I know a lot of fans already know it’s Ed’s voice on this track, but it still makes me laugh just about every time I hear it, so I like to point it out whenever I can. 🙂

A much more subtle example – one that’s actually pretty hard to hear – is the song Ed wrote for Hilary Duff. It’s called Tattoo, and he does backing vocals. This is one of my favorite songs that Ed has given to another artist, with one of my favorite lyrics he’s written: “I’m burning like the wire in lightbulbs.” I really wish he’d kept this one for himself, but Hilary does do a great job with it. This is what she told MTV News about working with Ed: 

Sheeran did all the background vocals on the song after waking her up in the middle of the night to record the track. “He vocally produced it and came in the booth with me,” she recalled. “I was really intimidated because, normally, they don’t do that, so I kept looking up and being like, ‘You’re Ed Sheeran and I’m singing the song that you wrote and I want to do right by it.’”

“It was awesome and then he, in like 15 minutes, did all the low stuff and the harmonies and the background,” she continued. “He just musically has to put in no effort it seems; it’s just him.”

Have a listen to the song right here. Isn’t it gorgeous? 

(i watched miss steven on netflix this week) h…

(i watched miss steven on netflix this week) hi i'm selling an ed sheeran ticket for his show in dallas on october 27th for $109.72 but it's negotiable i don't follow any ed accounts so i thought it'd be best to message you and maybe you could get the word out? my friend might be selling hers as well my name is jaden and people can reach me through this blog or my main blog assthetix. thank you!!

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Regular

edsheerans-iguanabeanybaby:

tea-and-toblerones:

daisies–daisies:

divide-swift:

sippin-on-red-wine:

littlebitofbass:

edsheeran-eu:

I’m seeing Ed in Chicago in October!

Who else is going?

Reblog this post if you’re going! Maybe we can do a little meetup before the show!

It’s going to be funnn!

this will be amazing!

CHICAGO HURRICANE NANNA IS COMING! Pls be gentle, I’m smol BUT EXCITED TO MEET ALL YOU GUYS.

MEEE I CANNOT WAIT TO SEE YOU ALL

Some thoughts on Ed Sheeran as “music for stra…

sitbackanddream:

Lately I have found people on this website seem to believe that only straight people like Ed Sheeran. It is sorted of taken for granted that all LGBTQ+ people don’t. As a gay (female) Ed Sheeran fan, I would like to offer a counter to this.

I think everyone can have whatever opinions on music that they want to have. I do, however, feel that a lot of the Ed Sheeran hate comes from this alternate version of him that has been constructed by people who just know songs like Shape of You and Perfect, songs which I’m not hugely keen on myself – but my Ed Sheeran is someone different. Growing up, his music was my anchor. And I think that in those early days, it was specifically as a gay kid (not that I knew it at the time), that Ed appealed to me so much.

2011. I was a 14 year old kid in England and I had never been interested in any contemporary music. It just didn’t speak to me. Then all of a sudden this guy ambles onto the scene and he wasn’t doing what everyone else was. He always just wore whatever hoodie he happened pull on that day, had this relatable awkward demeanour, and wrote these strangely quirky songs that weren’t like anything I’d heard before – not just “I miss you”, but “Hey, remember when we found a dead bird on the side of the road and you wanted to help it but it died, and I felt so guilty” or “Remember when we used to watch Shrek and play computer games and take walks on the beach…” Not “I’m blushing” but “she turns my cheeks the colour of my hair”. Not “she looks sad” but “her face seems slowly sinking, wasting, crumbling like pastries…” They weren’t deep lyrics but they were oddly specific, so you’d hear a song and know that only he could’ve written it. He made stories with his songs and they felt real to me in a way that I didn’t know music could.

Ed Sheeran was an acoustic singer-songwriter gradually making his way into the mainstream and even when he began touring with Taylor Swift and playing for the Queen, he wasn’t fitting into this pop star mould.

He was just himself.

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And I think, looking back, that was part of the appeal. Those early teenage years were confusing because all of sudden, all the girls around me were growing into a kind of femininity that for me, just didn’t fit. I remember being 12, 13, 14, and seeing all my friends gushing over whatever celebrity crush they had, and it was all these Bieber-esque, Twilight guys (no hate, this is just what it was) who were being marketed in a way to appeal to them. And there was this constant expectation that you had to have a crush on a guy. My friends always assumed I was lying when I said that I didn’t. 

When Ed Sheeran came along, it was like a release from all that because he was so far removed from that image. Suddenly it was possible (cool even, the more popular he became) to be a fan of a guy totally separate from any pressure of ‘the celebrity crush’. And when all my friends began taking clothes and make-up very seriously and I felt uncomfortable dressing like they did, Ed would show up to award shows amongst all the slick-haired guys in suits or whatever, just with his messy hair, wearing loose jeans and a sweatshirt. 

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And when I felt anxiety about everyone my age becoming more and more into boys and parties and everything being sexualised all the time, Ed Sheeran was playing with Lego bricks in interviews and making music videos with cats and playing shows dressed up as a gingerbread man.

And you’d go to these shows in 2011, 2012, and the kids there weren’t the cool kids, the ones who’d go to concerts decked out in make-up and their best clothes (not saying there’s anything wrong with doing that). We were kids who didn’t really fit in. We’d show up in our own hoodies and jeans. We were the teenagers who spent way too much time alone inside and not really going out with friends. The shy kids. The awkward kids. And I remember just feeling that at those shows back then – it was like being at his concert, I was in a safe space. We related to Ed’s awkwardness and how he didn’t fit into the scene that surrounded him. He spoke to the isolated. His music was for us.

(And you don’t know where to begin, ‘cause you spent a lifetime fitting in, only to wind up on the other side by yourself…)

(Another tear, another cry, another place for us to die, it’s not complicated…”)

(It don’t matter to me, all I want is a bit of dignity in me to battle this industry freely, to be me in this CD needy world, can your hear me?)

As I’ve grown up and have felt myself beginning to understand who and what I am, I can look back to Ed as my kind of icon of individuality. I felt more comfortable being who I am because of him, and who I am is a girl who likes girls. Ed Sheeran, in an odd way, was part of that realisation. I’m not saying Ed represented what it was to be gay, but he represented what it was to be different, and for me those two things were pretty tied up. With his hoodies and plaid shirts and persistence in being himself, even if it went against the flow of what everyone else in the industry was doing, he embodied how I wanted to present myself and who I wanted to be.

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(I mean, come on. He has his own signature flannel. And it’s awesome.)

People are bashing SOY hardcore now, misunders…

People are bashing SOY hardcore now, misunderstanding it as a mysoginistic "sex in the club" song. You once made an awesome post describing how this song is actually the opposite, explaining it in depth… can you repost it? The hate is making me sad when it's SO untrue and apparently people aren't getting the true meaning of the song!?

Hey, thanks for the kind words about my Shape of You post. It’s [here] (I’ll reblog it too). But keep in mind it was written as a celebration of that song and not as an argument against people who hate Ed simply because he’s… a successful white man… and I think if someone is bashing a song that they clearly haven’t listened to closely enough to understand the actual meaning of it, then they’re not likely to respond positively to (or even read) the post. I totally understand wanting to educate people who have no idea what they’re talking about, but if someone just wants to bitch for bitching’s sake, no amount of reasonable discussion of the subject is going to change their minds. 

I wish people weren’t so shitty. 

That being said, I’m all in favor of everyone’s right to voice an opinion on their own accounts. Even if they’re just whining and putting themselves in the way of other people’s enjoyment of social media. So in the interest of adding my own voice to the uproar, there are three points I’d like to make about the Grammys posts I’ve been seeing:

1. Folks keep complaining about the Recording Academy and saying that they ought to be blamed for awarding a Grammy to a musician the stans don’t personally like – as though if there were enough complaints, new members of the Recording Academy could somehow be elected and would vote in a way that more accurately reflects what the people think constitutes “good music.” I think these people must not realize who the Recording Academy is. The Recording Academy is the music industry itself. It is composed of singers, songwriters, producers, engineers, players of instruments. They all have the opportunity to vote in their own specialized fields and for the “big four” awards. Your fave is literally a member of the Recording Academy and had a chance to vote. The musicians you love – and the ones you don’t love – and the people who make every song you consume are the ones who vote for the awards. There’s not an election process. They are not there to represent you or your interests. And it’s not some panel of twelve old white men who don’t listen to the radio. These are thousands of professional musicians who use their personal judgment and experience as musical experts to choose what they think is the best music of the past year based on whatever criteria they think is the most important. That’s how it works. If you don’t like who they choose, become a musician and you can be one of the thousands of voting members of the Academy. That is the only way anyone will represent you there. Otherwise, the awards are simply at the mercy of the opinions of people who are involved in the actual making of music, and you can whine about it as much as you want, but you’re just screaming into the void. These awards are not for you. The whole point of the Grammys is for musicians to be recognized by their peers in the industry, not by fans. There are other awards that fans can vote in. 

2. Everyone has struggles. Everyone. Those struggles vary from person to person and can differ in severity and whether they are private or public. Sometimes when musicians experience painful things, those experiences manifest in their songs, which is perfectly fine and good. But when you judge a song, you judge the quality of the song based on elements within the song, not on the experience of the artist. An artist can go through something hard and write a beautiful song – and many have, including lots of this year’s Grammy nominees – but an artist can just as easily go through something hard and write a song that isn’t the best song in their genre that year according to other musicians, and that is perfectly fine too. An artist can also write a song about a common or positive experience that’s not super deep and it still be a really frickin good song. It’s true that just because something is the most popular that doesn’t always mean it’s the best, but by the same token, just because something is sad or empowering or came from a heartfelt place, that doesn’t always mean it’s the best either. The hardest worker doesn’t always create the best thing, the most generous person doesn’t always create the best thing, the person who has struggled the most doesn’t always create the best thing. None of that stuff matters when you’re judging the Thing. The Thing must stand alone. If there were a Grammy category for Person We Like the Most or Feel Sorriest For then maybe the life experiences of the artists would have some bearing on the outcome. Otherwise it’s a moot point.

3. Just because you didn’t get your way doesn’t mean you’ve been mistreated. Real injustices definitely exist all over the place, but sometimes a vote is just a vote, and at least four people in almost every Grammy category are going to have fewer votes than the fifth person. That doesn’t make it unfair. In fact, there is no fairer way to decide on a winner of this type of award. 

If I had a fourth point, it would be that I’m incredibly proud of Ed Sheeran. He’s an amazing singer and songwriter and put out a great album last year. 🙂

Thank you for the message and for allowing me the opportunity to share my thoughts.